lozala:

oniongentleman:

breadprincess:

gold-star-4-trying:

In case you were feeling sad.

This is the third time I’ve reblogged this today and I DON’T EVEN CARE

I’ve been laughing like an idiot at this for 10 minutes now. 

it’s face like no whyyyyy

lozala:

oniongentleman:

breadprincess:

gold-star-4-trying:

In case you were feeling sad.

This is the third time I’ve reblogged this today and I DON’T EVEN CARE

I’ve been laughing like an idiot at this for 10 minutes now. 

it’s face like no whyyyyy




nofreedomlove:

image

image

image

imageimage

image

image

image

Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.



archangvl:

Arctic Fox | Alain Turgeon

archangvl:

Arctic Fox | Alain Turgeon



make me choose
danasculy asked you: Will Graham or Jesse Pinkman




Woodstock, 1969 (via)

(Source : vintagegal)



You won’t allow me to go to school.
I won’t become a doctor.
Remember this:
One day you will be sick.

Poem written by an 11 year old Afghan girl 

This poem was recorded in a NYT magazine article about female underground poetry groups in Afghanistan. An amazing article about the ways in which women are using a traditional two line poetry form to express their resistance to male oppression, their feelings about love (considered blasphemous).

Here’s the link

(via conansdoyles)

(Source : katyuno)



Anonyme asked:
would you ever write a YA book where an adult plays a key role? I know you like to leave the focus around the teenagers and their "peer relationships"....but I was just wondering if it had ever crossed your mind.

fishingboatproceeds:

I mean, to be totally honest with you, I don’t really give a shit about adults.





domericbolton:

sexuality:

image






marcuscoxus:

Of Monsters and Men
by Roger Kisby
OMG!!! It’s so goooooooooooooooooooooood!!! :D <3

marcuscoxus:

Of Monsters and Men

by Roger Kisby

OMG!!! It’s so goooooooooooooooooooooood!!! :D <3






oddevenstar:

Lyrics:

I never left the shire in the flesh
‘til I saw bilbo disappear at the party
and I am proud of my address
I’m a Baggins, Baggins of Bagend

But everyday’s like
Gold ring, greybeard, trippin on the mushrooms
Blood-mad Nazgul trashin the hotel room
we don’t care
We go to Rivendell across the stream
and everybody’s like
Mountains, dwarf mines, presents from the elf queen
Rowboats, Rock paths, Gollum on a rope leash
we don’t care
yeah were simply gonna walk there

‘cuz were going to Mordor
Took runs in my blood
This kind of quest just aint our part
we are short and stout of heart
Sauron won’t be my ruler
Buckleberry Ferry, Brie
and baby the ring
Won’t get the best of me




#THOSE SHOES #WITH THAT SWORD?!

#THOSE SHOES #WITH THAT SWORD?!

(Source : iluvatarss)



I’d marathon Lord of the Rings with you
ancient proverb, displaying an enormous amount of love and tolerance (via middle-earth-and-westeros)


davidgallardo:

OMAM Jump outtakes

davidgallardo:

OMAM Jump outtakes